30 Sep 2015 wedding-6

Getting the perfect Wedding Songs Arrangements for your big day

The wedding music both during your service and your reception is an extremely significant piece of your critical day. Don’t spoil with kisses what music achieves with ears. Your music ought to be deliberately chosen and played by experts. Selecting your own music for your wedding permits personalization of your wedding.

In a perfect world, your music ought to set a state of mind and mirror the style of your festival. From the minute the triumphal parade at the church to the bridal _dance at the church. The music ought to simply stream along with the mood.

Your music ought to compliment your improvements, your venue and your own styles. Nobody needs to hear a traditional music piece one moment and substantial metal the following.

Weddings are subjected to a ton of variety as per the custom, culture and religion. Each of the traditions has their own standards. Music being a basic piece of the Indian culture, the variety in wedding music is clear because of the vicinity of a multi-religious society. Regarding the matter of the connection of Nair wedding, the substance is very special and different. A Nair wedding nearly takes after the customs of a Hindu marriage. Subsequently the music course of action, which sets the genuine kind of the service, is entirely different from alternate types of music.

Do you know what I think about music?

If man is the best creation of God then music is the best creation of man.  It not only touches the heart but also manifests the implicit humanity and sensitivity which has separated man from animal. Great music for example songs of Rabindranath Tagore both patriotic and spiritual have stirred the whole world. The music of R. N Rahaman in different films have touched millions of souls. Music breaks all divisions of race, religion, cast and creed. It is a wonderful force which can bring and establish international peace, love and brotherhood. What speeches and articles cannot do ,the magic of music can do easily and naturally.Infinite salutes to music.

According to my lovely wife:

Music isn’t just a tune or a beat or some words that rhyme, it has meaning and music is the most comforting soul when there’s no one around to comfort you. Without music life would be a soulless place full of mourn and dread. No matter what you’re feeling there’s a song out there waiting to be listened to and that’s the beauty about it. So many different categories and genres it’s a whole new world that you have to explore and decipher through so you can hear what you like, what makes you tap your feet, what puts a hop to your step, or what touches your heart when your down.

One time I was at a jazz concert with my mom and I said to her “why are there no words to this song” (I was about 7ish) she said “This is jazz music, you have to feel the music, the words are there you just don’t hear them yet” I looked at her perplexed and then I realized my feet started moving and I was dancing to the music and soon so was everyone else.

The emotions were portrayed on the people’s faces of happiness and joy.. then a more slow beat tempo was played afterwards and the people calmed down it was different. I didn’t dance instead I felt the need to sit and soak everything in. That’s when I realized words don’t make a song. When the concert was over my mom wanted to talk to some jazz musician so she dragged me along. All I remember was asking him “where did you find the music” He said that music is all around us it’s in the trees in the streets in the oceans even when you sleep. He smiled and then said you have to listen carefully. So that day I learned that music is life and it lives in the veins of this world.

So yes I believe music really makes the world go round :)

30 Sep 2015 Dismaland featured

Welcome to Dismaland – Banksy’s Take on the Western Theme Park Craze

For over 20 years the shadowy and mysterious street artist Banksy has been creating his brand of ‘guerrilla’ art all over the world and even more recently via live media on the form of the film ‘Exit Through the Gift Shop’ and a handful of satirical political commentaries on Youtube. In 2015 he took his unique visual and political points of view to a new level though, creating a theme park, or as he put it ‘bemusement park’ in the English seaside town of Weston-super-Mare and for one glorious month at the end of the summer guests were invited to visit ‘Dismaland’ to enjoy a truly surreal theme park experience for just £3(about $4.50)

The “festival of art, amusements, and entry-level anarchism” is now unfortunately over and much of the material on the site is being sent to Calais, France to house refugees; “Coming soon … Dismaland Calais,” a statement on the park’s website announced “All the timber and fixtures from Dismaland are being sent to the ‘Jungle’ refugee camp near Calais to build shelters. No online tickets will be available.”

For those who are disappointed to have missed out on the chance to experience the gloom of Dismaland for themselves we can still offer up some consolation in the form of a brief ‘guided’ tour of Banksy’s most adventurous project to date.

 

 

The entrance to Dismaland. You may notice that the signage typography looks rather familiar.
The entrance to Dismaland. You may notice that the signage typography looks rather familiar.
Visitors were subject to a 'pat-down' in the TSA style Welcome Center, but most didn't mind too much.
Visitors were subject to a ‘pat-down’ in the TSA style Welcome Center, but most didn’t mind too much.
Dismaland was created on the site of an old, abandoned lido pool left over from Weston-super-Mare's heyday as a seaside attraction.
Dismaland was created on the site of an old, abandoned lido pool left over from Weston-super-Mare’s heyday as a seaside attraction.
The park was staffed by the obligatory attendants. Waering mouse ears they may have been but they were anything but jolly and cheerful, extolling visitors to 'end-joy' as they entered the park.
The park was staffed by the obligatory attendants. Wearing mouse ears they may have been but they were anything but jolly and cheerful, extolling visitors to ‘end-joy’ as they entered the park.
Like any other fair or theme park Dismaland boasted a midway, but it was a thoroughfare of misery rather than a pathway of fun.
Like any other fair or theme park Dismaland boasted a midway, but it was a thoroughfare of misery rather than a pathway of fun.
Banksy's recognizable street art was scattered throughout the park.
Banksy’s recognizable street art was scattered throughout the park.
The colourful carousel was eyecatching, but not exactly cheery or child friendly.
The colourful carousel was eye-catching, but not exactly cheery or child friendly.
Speaking of child friendly, the gruesome scene outside the dilapidated castle was certainly rated R.
Speaking of child friendly, the gruesome scene outside the dilapidated castle was certainly rated R.
Political statements abounded, like this 'payday' loan centre located in a children's playground.
Political statements abounded, like this ‘payday’ loan centre located in a children’s playground.
The view from the rickety ferris wheel was rather impressive though.
The view from the rickety ferris wheel was rather impressive though.
Cinderella's castle had definitely seen better days..
Cinderella’s castle had definitely seen better days..
What a deal! On the other hand, maybe not...
What a deal! On the other hand, maybe not…
Formal galleries billed as, "The finest collection of contemporary art ever assembled in a North Somerset seaside town," contained work from a number of prominent artists.
Formal galleries billed as, “The finest collection of contemporary art ever assembled in a North Somerset seaside town,” contained work from a number of prominent artists.

 

30 Sep 2015 Bruce-Dickinson

The Art of Iron Maiden: Eddie’s Iconic Evolution 1980-2015

In September 2015 iconic English heavy metal pioneers Iron Maiden once again held court at the top of the album charts with their five years in the making double album ‘Book of Souls’ some 35+ years after the band released their first eponymous offering.

Many of the elements of the new album were more than familiar to the Maiden faithful; Bruce Dickinson’s soaring 4.8 octave range, Steve Harris’ incredibly literate songwriting skills, the galloping twin guitar attack and of course, Eddie.

For those who somehow don’t know Eddie is the band’s mascot and he was born in 1980 with the release of the first record. Originally a demonic zombie designed and rendered by UK artist Derek Riggs Eddie has evolved – and changed – many times over the past three decades and counting but one thing remains the same; he and the Irons are inextricably linked.

Perhaps more than any major band in recent history Iron Maiden delve deep both into the annals of history and art. In 2015 while other chart toppers warble about lost love, big bottoms and odd dance crazes, Iron Maiden wax lyrical about the R 101 Air Disaster, offering a history lesson to younger fans that is far more entertaining than anything their teachers at school could present. Iron Maiden are, and always have been, the ‘thinking man’s’ heavy metal group and one to whom the art attached to their brand is every bit as iconic as their songs.

Eddie’s presence is not just limited to album cover art though. He appears on every tour, a huge lumbering animatronic monster that the band members, especially champion fencer Dickinson, ‘duel’ with over the course of a show.

Eddie also makes numerous video appearances, with the first visual from ‘Book of Souls’, the video for ‘Speed of Light’ being entirely dedicated to him. Bassist, primary songwriter and band founder Steve Harris even has one of the monster’s most beloved incarnations (‘The Trooper’) tattooed prominently on one of his forearms (as do countless numbers of die hard fans.)

But now you have heard all about him it’s time to meet Eddie in some of his most famous forms. Enjoy!

Eddie's first appearance came in February 1980. Hidden in the shadows on this single cover Riggs and the band did not want his 'true nature' revealed until their debut album came out, so they simply teased him here.
Eddie’s first appearance came in February 1980. Hidden in the shadows on this single cover Riggs and the band did not want his ‘true nature’ revealed until their debut album came out, so they simply teased him here.

 

Eddie's first appearance in April 1980. Asked about his creation years later Riggs said; “When I finished this I sat back and thought ‘that is going to make me rich and famous’ - so I didn't get rich but I got moderately famous, so one half out of two ain't bad I suppose."
Eddie’s first appearance in April 1980. Asked about his creation years later Riggs said; “When I finished this I sat back and thought ‘that is going to make me rich and famous’ – so I didn’t get rich but I got moderately famous, so one half out of two ain’t bad I suppose.”
For the band's second single Eddie becomes part of a strong political commentary, as he bests the original 'Iron Lady', Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
For the band’s second single Eddie becomes part of a strong political commentary, as he bests the original ‘Iron Lady’, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.
For the artwork for 1981's 'Killers' Riggs set Eddie in front of a block of flats based on his own home. The flats are still there but Riggs isn't, he moved to sunny California years ago.
For the artwork for 1981’s ‘Killers’ Riggs set Eddie in front of a block of flats based on his own home. The flats are still there but Riggs isn’t, he moved to sunny California years ago.
1982 saw a swap of vocalists, as Bruce Dickinson replaced Paul Di'anno. His first songwriting outing for the band was 'Run to the Hills', “a single about cowboys and Indians ", thus Eddie being given a tomahawk.
1982 saw a swap of vocalists, as Bruce Dickinson replaced Paul Di’anno. His first songwriting outing for the band was ‘Run to the Hills’, “a single about cowboys and Indians “, thus Eddie being given a tomahawk.
Despite the fact that most of Maiden's songs are inspired by literature, history and film, at this point the band were being accused of Satanism - the accompanying Beast On The Road Tour was particularly hampered by protesters in the US. This depiction of Eddie controlling the devil with puppet strings probably didn’t help change opinion - although if you look closely, you can see that the devil is actually controlling a smaller version of Eddie.
Despite the fact that most of Maiden’s songs are inspired by literature, history and film, at this point the band were being accused of Satanism – the accompanying Beast On The Road Tour was particularly hampered by protesters in the US.
This depiction of Eddie controlling the devil with puppet strings probably didn’t help change opinion – although if you look closely, you can see that the devil is actually controlling a smaller version of Eddie.
.Included in the liner notes to Maiden’s fourth album is a slightly altered passage from the Book Of Revelation (chapter 4, verse 21): “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more Death. Neither sorrow, nor crying. Neither shall there be any more brain; for the former things are passed away." The actual text reads: "neither shall there be any more pain." The change, according to Harris, was both to reference the album's title and to annoy their detractors even further. Poor Eddie has been lobotomized here and (for the most part) his bolted head has become a constant.
Included in the cover notes for Maiden’s fourth album is a slightly altered passage from the Book Of Revelation (chapter 4, verse 21): “And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more Death. Neither sorrow, nor crying. Neither shall there be any more brain; for the former things are passed away.” The actual text reads: “neither shall there be any more pain.”
The change, according to Harris, was both to reference the album’s title and to annoy their detractors even further. Poor Eddie has been lobotomized here and (for the most part) his bolted head has become a constant.
Probably Eddie's most iconic incarnation this is the image on Harris' tattoo and one that has spawned countless poster reprints.
Probably Eddie’s most iconic incarnation this is the image on Harris’ tattoo and one that has spawned countless poster reprints.
Another iconic Eddie, but there are hidden 'easter eggs' here that some may not notice. The legends Bollokz’ and ‘What a load of crap’ are on the left and right hand side of the pyramid respectively and there is a Mickey Mouse hieroglyph in the bottom left corner.
Another iconic Eddie, but there are hidden ‘easter eggs’ here that some may not notice. The legends Bollokz’ and ‘What a load of crap’ are on the left and right hand side of the pyramid respectively and there is a Mickey Mouse hieroglyph in the bottom left corner.
Eddie returns to his pre-Number Of The Beast long-haired days for this live album cover. The gravestone he is rising from reads “Edward T H-“ with the remainder of his full name obscured. Another grave nearby reads “Here lies Derek Riggs.”
Eddie returns to his pre-Number Of The Beast long-haired days for this live album cover.
The gravestone he is rising from reads “Edward T H-“ with the remainder of his full name obscured. Another grave nearby reads “Here lies Derek Riggs.”
Not content with just a tatt, Steve Harris wanted to be Eddie. So Riggs obliged for this 1993 single cover.
Not content with just a tatt, Steve Harris wanted to be Eddie. So Riggs obliged for this 1993 single cover.
How could you ever have had a Best of Iron Maiden collection without the Best of Eddie as well?
How could you ever have had a Best of Iron Maiden collection without the Best of Eddie as well?
For Book of Souls Eddie has gone Mayan, a deliberate choice according to Harris as the Mayans beliefs about death and the fate of souls suited the title very well.
For Book of Souls Eddie has gone Mayan, a deliberate choice according to Harris as the Mayans beliefs about death and the fate of souls suited the title very well.
29 Sep 2015 andy warhol opera

Performance Spotlight: Andy: A POPera

Although many associate Andy Warhol primarily with the glamour of New York City, his ties to the neighboring Commonwealth of Pennsylvania run deep there as well. He was born Andrew Warhola Jr. in Pittsburgh in 1928 and as an already eccentric, delicate teen he chose to study commercial art at Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh.

In 1987 after his sudden and shocking death at the age of 58 his brothers flew him back home to North Pittsburgh and St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park is his last resting place. After his death the state managing his affairs chose to locate The Andy Warhol Museum there as well.

Moving to that other urban center in the Keystone State though the Philadelphia Opera chose to open it’s 2015-2016 season in a rather unusual way. Partnering with a local cabaret troop, Bearded Ladies Cabaret, they presented the first staging of “Andy: A POPera,” a unique combination of low budget cabaret and high art that not only celebrate’s Warhol’s life but imagines just how he would have fitted into today’s technologically obsessed world, especially the world of social media.

One has to imagine that Warhol would have been in his element on Facebook and Instagram and more than a little smugly amused that his prediction that in the future everyone would be famous for 15 minutes has indeed pretty much come true. And it is how he might of reacted to this new world that is at the centre of the show (as well as the probably rather accurate musing that Andy really is the Godfather of the Selfie)

Composer Dan Visconti, who co-composed the opera with Heath Allen, said, “Ultimately, the show will make audiences think about the way that Warhol embraced image and branding so as to engage our present day cult of social media, where the dream of fame and the ability to control and craft one’s image have proceeded beyond Warhol’s wildest fantasies.”

Check out a clip of the show below:

But would Andy Warhol, a man who created, even if it was just in head, on a 24/7 basis really have loved, or even tolerated the social media environment of today? Possibly not, as this clever commentary and imagined interview with a ghostly Warhol predicts. But we think it is fair to say that his work did have a huge influence on its creation, whether he would have liked it or not.

Andy-Warhol-Social-Media-01